Minuscule 811

New Testament manuscript

papyri
uncials
minuscules
lectionaries

Text
Gospels

Date
13th century

Script
Greek

Now at
National Library of Greece

Size
23 cm by 16.5 cm

Type
Byzantine text-type

Category
V

Note

Minuscule 811 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε4005 (von Soden),[1][2] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament written on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 13th century.

Contents

1 Description
2 Text
3 History
4 See also
5 References
6 Further reading
7 External links

Description[edit]
The codex contains the text of the four Gospels, on 289 parchment leaves (size 23 cm by 16.5 cm).[3]
The text is written in one column per page, 23 lines per page.[3][4]
Some parts of the Gospel of Matthew are on paper.[1]
Text[edit]
The Greek text of the codex is a representative of the Byzantine text-type. Aland placed it in Category V.[5]
It was not examined by Hermann von Soden. According to the Claremont Profile Method it has mixed Byzantine text in Luke 1 and represents textual family Kx in Luke 20. In Luke 10 no profile was made. It is related to the textual cluster 1053 in Luke 1.[6]
History[edit]
The manuscript is currently dated by the INTF to the 13th century.[4]
The scribe was Georgios, a priest. The manuscript was found in 1899.[1] It came from Corfu, and was held in Biblical Archaeology Society in Athens.[7]
It was added to the list of New Testament manuscripts by Gregory (811e). Gregory did not see it.[7]
The manuscript is now housed at the library of the National Library of Greece (2814) in Athens.[3][4]
See also[edit]

Bible portal

List of New Testament minuscules
Biblical manuscript
Textual criticism
Minuscule 809 (Gregory-Aland)

References[edit]

^ a b c Soden, von, Hermann (1902). Die Schriften des neuen Testaments, in ihrer ältesten erreichbaren Textgestalt / hergestellt auf Grund ihrer Textgeschichte. 1. Berlin: Verlag von Alexander Duncker. p. 205. 
^ Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs’sche Buchhandlung. p. 76. 
^ a b c Aland, Kurt; M. Welte; B. Köster; K. Junack (1994). Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments. Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter. p. 94. ISBN 3-11-011986-2. 
^ a b c “Liste Handschriften”. Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 16 November 2010. 
^

Gran

Location
Gran, Lunner
Norway

Coordinates
60°21′33″N 10°34′11″E / 60.359065°N 10.569606°E / 60.359065; 10.569606Coordinates: 60°21′33″N 10°34′11″E / 60.359065°N 10.569606°E / 60.359065; 10.569606

Elevation
205.2 m

Owned by
Norwegian National Rail Administration

Operated by
NSB Gjøvikbanen

Line(s)
Gjøvik Line

Distance
67.66 km

Platforms
2

History

Opened
20 December 1900

Gran Station (Norwegian: Gran stasjon) is located on the Gjøvik Line at Gran in Norway. The station was opened on 20 December 1900. It is served by the Oslo Commuter Rail, operated by NSB Gjøvikbanen, twice each two hours.
External links[edit]

Entry at Jernbaneverket (English)<
Entry at the Norwegian Railway Club (Norwegian)

Preceding station
Line
Following station

Lunner
Gjøvik Line
Jaren
Nordtangen

Preceding station
Regional trains
Following station

Lunner
R30
Oslo S–Gjøvik
 
Jaren

Preceding station
Local trains
Following station

Lunner
L3
Oslo S–Jaren
 
Jaren

This Norwegian railway station-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Location of Djibouti

This is a list of butterflies of Djibouti. About 9 species are known from Djibouti,[1] none of which is endemic.[2]

Contents

1 Pieridae

1.1 Pierinae

2 Lycaenidae

2.1 Theclinae

2.1.1 Theclini

2.2 Polyommatinae

2.2.1 Polyommatini

3 Nymphalidae

3.1 Satyrinae

3.1.1 Satyrini

3.2 Nymphalinae

3.2.1 Nymphalini

4 Hesperiidae

4.1 Pyrginae

4.1.1 Tagiadini
4.1.2 Carcharodini

5 References

Pieridae[edit]
Pierinae[edit]

Colotis danae eupompe (Klug, 1829)
Colotis halimede (Klug, 1829)

Lycaenidae[edit]
Theclinae[edit]
Theclini[edit]

Iolaus tajoraca Walker, 1870
Deudorix livia (Klug, 1834)

Polyommatinae[edit]
Polyommatini[edit]

Tarucus rosacea (Austaut, 1885)

Nymphalidae[edit]
Satyrinae[edit]
Satyrini[edit]

Ypthima asterope (Klug, 1832)

Nymphalinae[edit]
Nymphalini[edit]

Hypolimnas bolina jacintha (Drury, [1773])

Hesperiidae[edit]
Pyrginae[edit]
Tagiadini[edit]

Caprona pillaana Wallengren, 1857

Carcharodini[edit]

Spialia doris (Walker, 1870)

References[edit]

^ African Butterfly Database
^ Afrotropical Butterflies

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List of butterflies of Africa

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The Gambia
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Gilmore

SkyTrain station

Location
2199 Gilmore Avenue, Burnaby

Coordinates
49°15′54″N 123°00′49″W / 49.26489°N 123.01351°W / 49.26489; -123.01351Coordinates: 49°15′54″N 123°00′49″W / 49.26489°N 123.01351°W / 49.26489; -123.01351

Owned by
BC Ministry of Transportation, TransLink

Platforms
Side platforms

Tracks
2

Construction

Structure type
Elevated

Disabled access
Yes

Other information

Station code
GM

Fare zone
2

History

Opened
August 31, 2002

Traffic

Passengers (2011[1])
8,362

Services

Preceding station
 
TransLink
 
Following station

Rupert
toward VCC–Clark

Millennium Line

Brentwood Town Centre
toward Lafarge Lake–Douglas

Gilmore is a station on the Millennium Line of the SkyTrain system in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. The station is located at Gilmore Avenue and Dawson Street. The station is adjacent to several new high rise condominium complexes which are a component of the Brentwood Town Centre Development Plan, responsible for overseeing the area transformed from light industrial/lower occupancy commercial, into an urbanized centre. It is also next to the Vancouver Film Studios.
The station, completed in 2002, is elevated with two platforms each on either side of the SkyTrain tracks. The station was designed by Busby and Associates who also designed the impressive Brentwood Town Centre station. Dominion Construction built the Gilmore station as part of a $14.3-million contract that also included Brentwood Town Centre station and the Gilmore power substation.
As the station is expected to be incorporated into a new commercial complex, the wood and metal frames were designed to be easily disassembled and then reconfigured, maintaining the artistic intention of the station and accommodating any future alterations to the SkyTrain line or development around it.
Locations of a number of popular stores and restaurants are near the station, such as Home Depot, Staples, White Spot, Earls, Swiss Chalet, Boston Pizza, Tim Hortons, Extreme Pita, Quiznos, Taco del Mar as well as two hotels, Accent Inn and Executive Inn.
Bus service[2][edit]
See also: List of bus routes in Metro Vancouver

28 Joyce Station
28 Phibbs Exchange / Capilano University
129 Edmonds Station
129 Patterson Station
N9 Coquitlam Station

References[edit]

^ “2011 SkyTrain Station Counts”. TransLink. Retrieved August 10, 2016. 
^ TransLink (June 2015). G

Arlene Harden

Born
(1945-03-01) March 1, 1945 (age 71)[1]

Origin
England, Arkansas, U.S.

Genres
Country

Years active
1966–1978

Labels
Columbia
Capitol
Elektra

Associated acts
The Harden Trio

Ava “Arlene” Harden (born March 1, 1945 in England, Arkansas) is an American country music singer. Between 1966 and 1968, she was one-third of The Harden Trio, which comprised her brother, Bobby and sister, Robbie. Arlene recorded for Columbia Records as a solo artist between 1967 and 1973, charting fifteen times on the Hot Country Songs charts.[1] Her most successful release was a cover of Roy Orbison’s “Oh, Pretty Woman”, titled “Lovin’ Man (Oh Pretty Woman)”.[2] She later recorded for Capitol and Elektra as Arleen Harden.[1]

Contents

1 Discography

1.1 Albums
1.2 Singles

2 References

Discography[edit]
Albums[edit]

Title
Album details

What Can I Say

Release date: August 1968
Label: Columbia Records

Arlene Harden Sings Roy Orbison

Release date: March 1970
Label: Columbia Records

I Could Almost Say Goodbye

Release date: June 1975
Label: Capitol Records

Singles[edit]

Year
Single
Peak positions
Album

US Country
[1]
CAN Country
[3]

1967
“You and Only You”


N/A

“Fair Weather Love”
48

What Can I Say

“You’re Easy to Love”
49

N/A

1968
“He’s a Good Ole Boy”
32

What Can I Say

“What Can I Say”
41

1969
“Too Much of a Man (To Be Tied Down)”
45

N/A

“My Friend”
63

Arlene Harden Sings Roy Orbison

1970
“Lovin’ Man (Oh Pretty Woman)”
13
24

“Crying”
28

1971
“True Love Is Greater Than Friendship”
22

N/A

“Married to a Memory”
25

“Congratulations (You Sure Made a Man out of Him)”
49

“Ruby Gentry’s Daughter”
46

1972
“A Special Day”
29

“It Takes a Lot of Tenderness”
45

1973
“Would You Walk with Me Jimmy”
21

1974
“Leave Me Alone (Ruby Red Dress)”
72

I Could Almost Say Goodbye

1975
“I Could Almost Say Goodbye”

“Country Sunday”

“Roll On, Sweet Mississippi”

1976
“Misty Mountain Rain”


N/A

1977
“Southern Belle”

“A Place Where Love Has Been”
100

1978
“You’re Not Free and I’m Not Easy”
74

“—” denotes releases that did not chart

References[edit]

^ a b c d Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 179. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
^ “Arlene Harden biography”. Allmusic. Retrieved 5 December 2015. 
^ “RPM Country Tracks for June

Morgan House

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

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Location
S of South Mills off U.S. 17, near South Mills, North Carolina

Coordinates
36°24′47″N 76°20′2″W / 36.41306°N 76.33389°W / 36.41306; -76.33389Coordinates: 36°24′47″N 76°20′2″W / 36.41306°N 76.33389°W / 36.41306; -76.33389

Area
1 acre (0.40 ha)

Built
1826 (1826)

Built by
Hinton, William S.

Architectural style
Federal

NRHP Reference #
72000984[1]

Added to NRHP
February 1, 1972

Morgan House is a historic home located near South Mills, Pasquotank County, North Carolina. It was built in 1826, and is a two-story, three bay, Federal style, temple-form frame dwelling. It sits on a brick pier foundation, with a three-part form-a central section flanked by porches. The front facade features a “dwarf portico” supported by two pairs of vernacular Doric order columns that carry an arched central bay.[2]
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). “National Register Information System”. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
^ John B. Wells, III (October 1971). “Morgan House” (pdf). National Register of Historic Places – Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-02-01. 

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U.S. National Register of Historic Places in North Carolina

Topics

Contributing property
Keeper of the Register
Historic district
History of the National Register of Historic Places
National Park Service
Property types

Lists
by county

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Wa

“Klee” redirects here. For other uses, see Klee (disambiguation).

Paul Klee

Paul Klee in 1911

Born
18 December 1879
Münchenbuchsee near Bern, Switzerland

Died
29 June 1940(1940-06-29) (aged 60)
Muralto, Switzerland

Nationality
Swiss

Education
Academy of Fine Arts, Munich

Known for
Painting, drawing, watercolor, printmaking

Notable work
more than 10,000 paintings, drawings, and etchings, including Twittering Machine (1922), Fish Magic (1925), Viaducts Break Ranks (1937).

Movement
Expressionism, Bauhaus, Surrealism

Paul Klee (German: [paʊ̯l ˈkleː]; 18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a Swiss-German artist. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included Expressionism, Cubism, and Surrealism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually deeply explored color theory, writing about it extensively; his lectures Writings on Form and Design Theory (Schriften zur Form und Gestaltungslehre), published in English as the Paul Klee Notebooks, are held to be as important for modern art as Leonardo da Vinci’s A Treatise on Painting for the Renaissance.[1][2][3] He and his colleague, Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the Bauhaus school of art, design and architecture. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes childlike perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and his musicality.

Contents

1 Early life and training
2 Marriage and early years

2.1 Marriage
2.2 Affiliation to the “Blaue Reiter”, 1911
2.3 Participation in art exhibitions, 1912/1913
2.4 Trip to Tunis, 1914
2.5 Military career

3 Mature career
4 Death
5 Style and methods
6 Works

6.1 Early works
6.2 Mystical-abstract period, 1914–1919
6.3 Works in the Bauhaus period and in Düsseldorf
6.4 Last works in Switzerland

7 Reception and legacy

7.1 Contemporary view
7.2 Musical interpretations

7.2.1 Additional musical interpretations

7.3 Architectural honors

8 Works and publications

8.1 Works
8.2 Publications
8.3 Books, essays and lectures by Paul Klee

9 See also
10 Notes and references

10.1 Notes
10.2 References

11 Further reading
12 External links

Early life and training[edit]

First of all, the art of living; then as my ideal profession, poetry and philosophy, and as my real profession, plastic arts; in the last resort, for lack of income, illustrations.
— Paul Klee.[4]

Paul Klee was born in Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland, as the second child of German music teacher Hans Wi